Journée d’étude pluridisciplinaire – La relation souffrants soignants : espaces incertains

LA RELATION SOUFFRANTS SOIGNANTS : ESPACES INCERTAINS

 

Jeudi 10 janvier 2013, 9h30-17h

Université Toulouse II le Mirail, Maison de la recherche, D29

 

Journée d’étude organisée par le laboratoire Framespa – UMR 5136, thématique Santé et société, Atelier 1 – Santé et politiques sociales : acteurs, institutions, cultures ; en collaboration avec le LISST – UMR 5193.

 

Responsables scientifiques : Jean-Yves Bousigue, Bruno Valat et Didier Foucault

9h30

Introduction

Bruno Valat (Histoire, Framespa, Univ. Jean-François Champollion)

 

9h45

Diafoirus ou Esculape : les médecins sous la plume des souffrants au XVIIIe siècle

Nahema Hanafi (Histoire, Framespa, Univ. Toulouse II et Unil)

 

10h30-10h45. Pause

 

10h45

Les expériences sexuées des pathologies cancéreuses

Anastasia Meidani (Sociologie, LISST, Univ. Toulouse II)

 

11h30

Des mots pour des maux. Diagnostic astrologique, relations de pouvoir et représentations de la destinée en Inde du sud.

Alexis Avdeef  (Anthropologie, EHESS)

 

12h15-14h. Pause déjeuner

14h

Poreux. Raisons et horizons de l’autre guérir

Nicolas Adell (Anthropologie, LISST, Univ. Toulouse II)

 

14h45

Usages et mobilisations de la culture dans la relation de soin autour du VIH aux Antilles françaises

Stéphanie Mulot (Sociologie, LISST, Univ. Toulouse II)

 

15h30 – 15h45. Pause

 

15h45

La culture des psychiatres. Pluralisme médical et santé mentale

François Sicot (Sociologie, LISST, Univ. Toulouse II) et Slimane Touhami (Anthropologie, LISST, Univ. Toulouse II)

 

16h30

Conclusion

Jean-Yves Bousigue (Histoire, Framespa, Univ. Toulouse II)

Appel à contribution – Melancholia-ae. The religious experience of the « disease of the soul » and its definitions in the early modern period : censorship, dissent and self-representation

Appel à contribution – Melancholia-ae. The religious experience of the « disease of the soul » and its definitions in the early modern period : censorship, dissent and self-representation

The seminar aims at exploring the different meanings of the term « melancholy » in early modern religion, both Protestant and Catholic. One of its main purposes will be to enquire into, clarify, and emphasize both elements of continuity and what was specific to each of the diverse discourses on melancholy within the historical, socio-cultural, political, geographical and linguistic contexts that framed its production.

In its various historic-artistic, medical, literary, philosophical and psychological manifestations, melancholy has been the subject of a vast literature. Moreover, ‘melancholy’ – the word itself – is a polysemic term historically associated with a large variety of groups of distinct meanings. In particular, it underwent a sort of semantic expansion between the 16th and 17th century.

It became the name of what the physiologic-medical tradition, going back to antiquity, considered a humoral pathology of the black bile, of an experience of ‘moral’ suffering and also of a mental or emotional disorder, a discomfort sometimes described by sufferers as  ‘abandonment’, ‘dark night’, ‘dryness’, ‘sorrow’ etc. and often lived out in imitatio Christi. In the light of all this, the notion of melancholy became an established means for carefully analyzing a large range of cases and their various symptoms and discerning the origin (whether divine, demonic or natural) of spiritual suffering; at the same time, it became a polemical category for transgression and individual or collective patterns of behaviour that were regarded as abnormal.

Within the spheres of medicine, theology and law, the idea emerged that melancholy may be the expression of dissent, of the subject’s incapacity or unwillingness to conform to social rules and customs, and went as far as to polemically present melancholy as a collective phenomenon of given social groups, to denote a ‘national’ malaise (English malady) or, by reference to seventeenth-century political and religious instability, to designate the ‘disease of the century’.

The proposed seminar aims at exploring the different meanings of the term ‘melancholy’ in early modern religion, both Protestant and Catholic. One of its main purposes will be to enquire into, clarify, and emphasize both elements of continuity and what was specific to each of the diverse discourses on melancholy within the historical, socio-cultural, political, geographical and linguistic contexts that framed its production.

It will be, therefore, a question of analysing the ways these discourses came to be structured, who made use of them and how, how they intersected one another – for instance, what points of contact existed among the medical, philosophical, literary, artistic and religious discourses – how they changed through time and what forms of social practice and types of texts were involved. Given this point of view, an interdisciplinary and transcultural approach will be privileged, one which goes beyond the traditional confessional perspective to emphasize intersections and comparisons even among different areas of historical study from cultural to gender history, from the history of medicine to that of emotions.

Proposals may be presented (although not exclusively) on the following themes either in the form of individual case studies or in a more theoretical and methodological mode.

  1. Analysis of  the language(s) of melancholy with particular attention to the medical and spiritual treatments proposed for its understanding, examination and/or cure. We would like to reflect on individual and group perceptions of spiritual suffering, on discursive definitions of its causes (natural and supernatural alike) and on the lines of reasoning that contributed to the stigmatization/censorship of the experience or, conversely, to its spiritual appraisal. Proposed topics: melancholy and devotion, melancholy as a spiritual trial, tristitia spiritualis, religious interpretations and elaborations of the theme of suicide, body/soul and ‘anatomies of the soul’, etc.
  2. The derogatory use of the term ‘melancholy’ by the various confessional orthodoxies to stigmatize the unbridgeable gap that separated not only individuals but also entire groups from the imposed imperatives of social and religious models as well as deplete the term’s potential subversive power. We intend to define and study the procedures that excluded dissidents from the community and thereby fixed the borders of rightness but which, by so doing, often, paradoxically, provoked the opposite effect of legitimizing groups or individual ‘sectarians’ or ‘eccentrics’, who ended up identifying precisely the stigma as the distinctive feature of their own identity. Proposed topics: melancholy as the ‘disease of the century’, melancholy and atheism, the ‘monasteries’ sickness’, the critique of scrupulous and zealous religiosity, etc.
  3. The connection between melancholy, demonic possession and ‘inordinate devotions’ provided the leitmotiv for much contemporary, disputed spirituality and mysticism within the Catholic ground. On the other hand, debate in both Catholicism and various Protestant contexts on melancholy combined with the wider debate concerning religious fanaticism or ‘enthusiasm’, which terms were used to label chiliastic groups, radical sects, the early Quakers and the Camisards, all of whom became the object of detailed theological, social and medical analyses in an attempt to distinguish between true and false inspiration, the natural and supernatural dimensions and melancholy and possession. Proposed topics: melancholy as a sign of fanaticism, enthusiasm or millenarianism; melancholy and demonic possession; melancholy and ‘pretended sanctity’; etc.

Submissions

The seminar will be held in Venice, 28-29 November 2013 (date to be confirmed); its proceedings will be published either in a monographic issue of an academic periodical or as a dedicated volume.

Proposals will be considered for 20-minute papers and/or written contributions (up to a maximum length of 40,000 characters).

Proposals for papers or written contributions (max. 3000 characters), supplemented by a short cv and bibliography, must be sent to Adelisa Malena (adelisa.malena@unive.it)  or Lisa Roscioni (lisa.roscioni@unipr.it)

by 15 February 2013.

Languages: Italian, English, French.

If funding will be available, hospitality will be offered to speakers. A reimbursement of travel expenses also may be provided pending the availability of budgetary resources.

Scientific committee

Alessandro Arcangeli, Federico Barbierato, Adelisa Malena, Chiara Petrolini, Lisa Roscioni, Xenia Von Tippelskirch, Daniela Solfaroli Camillocci, Stefano Villani.

LIEUX

  • Venise, Italie

DATES

  • vendredi 15 février 2013

 

Parution – Mécaniques du vivant : Savoir médical et représentations du corps humain (XVIIe-XIXe siècle)

Parution – Mécaniques du vivant : Savoir médical et représentations du corps humain (XVIIe-XIXe siècle)

Les actes des journées d’étude EXPLORA (CAS – EA 801/Muséum d’Histoire Naturelle de Toulouse) « Mécaniques du vivant: Savoir médical et représentations du corps humain (XVIIe-XIXe siècle) », organisées dans le cadre du projet inter-MSH « Savoirs littéraires, savoirs scientifiques », les 5 et 6 décembre 2011 au Muséum d’Histoire Naturelle de Toulouse et au Musée d’Histoire de la Médecine de Toulouse ont été mis en ligne sur le site de la revue en ligne Epistémocritique.

Vous pourrez y accéder en cliquant sur le lien suivant :

http://www.epistemocritique.org/spip.php?rubrique63

Mécaniques du vivant : Savoir médical et représentations du corps humain (XVIIe–XIXe siècle)

Introduction
Laurence Talairach-Vielmas (Université Toulouse 2 Le Mirail/CAS-EA
801), Rafael Mandressi (CNRS, Centre Alexandre-Koyré – Histoire des
sciences et des techniques)

Système cérébronerveux et activités sensorimotrices de la physiologie
ancienne au mécanisme des Lumières
Didier Foucault (Université de Toulouse 2 Le Mirail/Framespa/CNRS – UMR 5136)

Sous la lame, point d’essence ? L’excoriation dans le théâtre de la
Renaissance
Nathalie Rivere de Carles (Université Toulouse 2 Le Mirail/CAS-EA 801)

Le Corps syphilitique dans le théâtre anglais de la Renaissance
Frédérique Fouassier (Université de Tours, Centre d’Etudes Supérieures
de la Renaissance)

Ecrire avec les nerfs : Médecine et anatomie chez Georg Büchner
Laurence Dahan-Gaida (Université de Franche-Comté)

Corps mystiques, esprits malades
Gisèle Séginger (Université Paris-Est/Marne-la-Vallée/LISAA – EA 4120)

Les Corps mesmériques à l’ère victorienne
Gaïd GIRARD (Université de Bretagne Occidentale/HCTI/EA 4249/UEB, Brest)

« Shapeless dead creatures … float[ing] in yellow liquid » : Dissection,
Exposition et Traitement du Système Nerveux dans Armadale de Wilkie
Collins
Laurence Talairach-Vielmas (Université Toulouse 2 – Le Mirail/CAS-EA 801)

Le Singe et l’ange : Le corps de l’origine dans la littérature de la
fin du XIXe siècle
Hélène Machinal (Université de Bretagne Occidentale/HCTI/EA 4249/UEB, Brest)

Le Corps invisible dans Le Secret de Wilhem Storitz de Jules Verne
Pierre C. Lile (CEHM/ Université de Toulouse 2 Le Mirail/Framespa/CNRS
– UMR 5136)

Appel à contribution – Purifier, soigner ou guérir ? Maladies et lieux religieux de la Méditerranée antique à la Normandie médiévale. Regards croisés

Appel à contribution – Purifier, soigner ou guérir ? Maladies et lieux religieux de la Méditerranée antique à la Normandie médiévale. Regards croisés


1er – 4 octobre 2014


L’hypothèse formulée par des biologistes américains d’une possible corrélation entre la présence récurrente d’épidémies infectieuses et l’apparition des religions comme facteurs d’entraide et de regroupement humains, invite à réévaluer la place et le rôle des comportements religieux en lien avec les maladies.
Le prochain colloque de Cerisy-la-Salle, organisé par le CRAHAM (Centre de Recherches Archéologiques et Historiques Anciennes et Médiévales) et l’OUEN (Office Universitaire d’Études Normandes) de l’Université de Caen, a pour objet d’effectuer une première synthèse sur l’empreinte des phénomènes religieux dans le traitement des maladies au sein des sociétés antiques et médiévales.
Forte d’une documentation exceptionnelle et de recherches archéologiques et paléopathologiques récentes, la Normandie médiévale offre un terrain d’investigations privilégié. Oser une approche comparatiste suppose de distendre l’espace et la chronologie. Aussi, l’aire géographique parcourue s’ouvre de la Grèce en passant par l’Italie, la Scandinavie, l’Irlande, l’Écosse, le Pays de Galles, jusqu’au monde anglo-normand terme spatial et chronologique de la démarche. Celle-ci s’inscrit dans une « longue durée » qui s’étend du VIIIe siècle avant Jésus-Christ au début du XIIIe siècle de notre ère, acmé de l’éclosion des lieux pieux de la charité chrétienne occidentale.
Quelle est la place géographique et sociale des sanctuaires ? Dans quelle mesure, les sanctuaires participent-ils à la construction religieuse du territoire ? Le processus de médicalisation est-il d’origine religieuse ? La diffusion des savoirs médicaux éclipse-t-elle le religieux ? Quelles continuités et quelles ruptures peut-on déceler entre l’Antiquité et le Moyen Âge ?

Le présent colloque veut rassembler du 1er au 4 octobre 2014, archéologues, anthropologues, paléoanthropologues, linguistes et historiens pour faire le point de nos connaissances et de nos méconnaissances en quatre thèmes :
1. Entre punition et élection : les maladies sont-elles sacrées ?
2. Thérapeutes et mortifères : dieux, saints et rois
3. Typologie, topographie et fonctions des lieux religieux
4. Savoirs médicaux, rites et pratiques de guérison/purification/exorcisme

Les projets de communications sont à fournir avant le 1er février 2014 

CONTACTS
Damien JEANNE – Membre associé au CRAHAM – UMR 6273 CNRS, Université de Caen – Basse-Normandiedamien.jeanne@unicaen.fr 
Cécile CHAPELAIN DE SERÉVILLE-NIEL – Anthropologue (CRAHAM – UMR 6273 CNRS), Université de Caen – Basse- Normandie cecile.niel@unicaen.fr 
Pierre SINEUX – Professeur d’histoire grecque (CRAHAM – UMR 6273 CNRS), Université de Caen – Basse-Normandiepierre.sineux@unicaen.fr